Friday, 4 April 2014

Guest Blogging

My guest blog for the Chipping Norton Literary Festival:

Gardening author John Shortland has put his green-fingers to the keyboard to tell us all about his ChipLit event
Are you sometimes disappointed with the look of your garden? Unsure what to grow where? Or just never seem to have enough hours in the day to get outside?  What happens when you can’t recognise one plant from another?  These are just some of the issues I’ll be considering in my informal, illustrated discussion.

‘Why Can’t My Garden Look Like That?’ is a question I’ve been asked many times during my career as Head Gardener to some of the most exclusive country gardens in Oxfordshire.  I have also been an adviser at the Chelsea Flower Show and worked for Channel 4 television alongside designer Dan Pearson. I’ll be drawing upon my wealth of practical experience to answer this often-asked question.
Most people these days have to juggle careers and a host of other things, leaving little time for gardening. But there are many ways that it is possible to still have a great looking garden without having to spend every waking hour in it.

In my talk (and book of the same title) I’ll look at simple, jargon-free and straightforward methods to improve the layout of your garden.  I’ll also look at different plant combinations and offer tips on how to make your garden one that others will envy.  A short walk will take you to see a garden in the heart of the town where some of these ideas can be put to the test.  Don’t worry – it doesn’t involve getting your hands or shoes dirty!

As the session ends with an opportunity to ask me questions over a cup of tea and a scone, it is quite probable that this event will run over its scheduled time.

John Shortland

Tickets for this event are limited and are already selling fast: Why Can’t My Garden Look Like That? The Vintage Sports Car Club, Sunday 27th April, 1.30pm



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Thursday, 20 March 2014

Where Waters Meet

With two rushing rivers – Hoar Oak Water and the East Lyn River - merging in a series of spectacular cascades and rapids it is hardly surprising that Watersmeet is one of Exmoor’s most popular visitor’s attractions.  Its deep, wooded valley is doubly protected for not only does it lie within the heart of the National Park 340 acres were gifted to the National Trust.   Watersmeet House, now a cafĂ© but originally built as a romantic fishing lodge, and with car parking nearby makes a good place to begin and end a walk.
There are numerous paths that can be taken from here and most link up to create walks of varying lengths.  They hug the valley bottom or rise steeply to the tops of the surrounding hills so it is possible for almost anyone, regardless of their ability to have an enjoyable outing.  It should be remembered that even in dry weather the paths can be quite rugged so good, solid footwear is always recommended.  A stout stick or walking poles won’t go amiss, especially if you choose the hillier paths.
 Apart from the noise and excitement of the rivers, the other awe-inspiring feature of Watersmeet is its woodland which clings to the steep, three hundred foot sides of the valley.  These are some of the best examples of ‘hanging’ woods in the country and are relics of the ancient woodland that once covered lowland Britain.  Mostly the trees are sessile oak although there are some fine specimens of beech in the better soil of the valley bottom.  There are also a number of Whitebeam species that can only be found here or in neighbouring woodlands making them of national importance.
As soon as you start walking, any crowds are soon left behind and you have the splendour of the place to yourself.  Following the East Lyn River upstream the remains of a nineteenth century lime kiln can be explored.  Lime was brought by sea from Wales to be burned before spreading onto the fields to counteract the land’s extreme acidity.  Fuel for the kilns was provided by the woodland which was coppiced and some of this timber was also sent back to Wales to be used in the iron foundries.
 Wildlife abounds; there are dippers and herons by the water’s edge, and red deer, badgers and otters can all be seen by the fortunate few.  On quieter stretches of the river the calls of raven and buzzard can be heard overhead.
After an hour or so, the tiny hamlet of Rockford appears, consisting of just a few cottages and an inn - another great excuse for a stop.  From here you can trace your route back to Watersmeet or continue along the river to the village of Brendon to make a longer, circular walk.
Watersmeet is open to the public all year round and every season has its special moments.  In the spring, the valley is lush and green; in summer the sunlight filters through the canopy to play on the water's surface; in autumn there are the changing colours and in winter, the extraordinary beauty of the gnarled trees adorned with grey lichens come to the fore.  It needs to be visited more than just once!
 
For more information take a look at these websites:
National Trust
The Rockford Inn
Exmoor National Park




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Sunday, 2 March 2014

A Garden Invitation

If you are disappointed or disillusioned with your garden - or just not too sure how to begin - then this may be the answer: come and join me at the Chipping Norton Literary Festival next month.

Click on the image to enlarge.
Hope to see you there!




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Wednesday, 19 February 2014

Richard Jefferies - His Passion Lives On

Great artists such as Gainsborough, Turner and Reubens speak to us down the centuries through their work as do poets but how many people still read the great - or the lesser - writers from years past?  The Bible is still read regularly by some, Shakespeare's more famous lines are often quoted and we all think we know Bronte and Dickens whereas, in reality, most of us know the characters only as interpreted through television and film.  However, authors from past centuries still  have much to offer whether it be for historical background, research or, simply, pleasure.

I have always lived in the country and my fascination with the natural world began at a very early age.  My kindergarten class was taken on a nature walk and, as our teacher showed us the magical things to be found along the way, I became hooked and wanted to know more.  There are many excellent wildlife manuals and handbooks, new and old, that give detailed descriptions more often than not, in a rather dry, analytical way.  Wouldn't it be wonderful if there was someone who could give all this information in great detail; who would notice the minutiae of everyday things, whether a flower, a wild creature or even of man, himself?  In the late nineteenth century there was one such person, now forgotten by most, and his name is Richard Jefferies - most definitely not a poet but there is poetry in his words.

Jefferies, born in 1848, in a Wiltshire (England) farmhouse suffered ill-health and subsequent poverty for much of his life.  From a young age he had enjoyed solitude and wandering about the countryside and here he developed a fascination for the Iron Age hill fort on nearby Liddington Hill and the wildlife that could be found there.  Employment as a reporter, initially with a local newspaper, developed his writing skills and his literary work began to be published, first as a series of essays and later in book form, from 1874.  He died from tuberculosis in 1887.  His books vary from collections of nature notes and the countrymen he encountered on his travels to novels, including one, After London, which would now be described as post-apocalyptical.  In it he describes how nature has taken over the now vanished city with its few surviving inhabitants returning to the lifestyle of many centuries before.  Jefferies still has his devotees, myself included, and he deserves better recognition.  The remainder of this post is my demonstration of how his words are of relevance to everyone today, especially those who are passionate about the wonders of nature - not the awe-inspiring world famous creatures or places but the everyday ones, found all around us, that should be equally awe-inspiring.

Nothing sums up my feelings towards the natural world better than these words of his.  They almost seem to have been written to illustrate this photograph of myself aged four with my father.
"So it seemed to me as a boy, sweet and new like this each morning; and now after the years they have passed, and the lines they have worn in the forehead, the summer mead shines as bright and fresh as when my foot first touched the grass..."      
The Open Air, 1885

"Next he stepped into the current, which, though shallow, looked strong enough to sweep him away. The water checked against him rose to the white mark on his breast. He waded up the rapid, every now and then thrusting his head completely under the water; sometimes he was up to his neck, sometimes not so deep; now and then getting on a stone..."                                                                 The Water Colley (Dipper), The Life of the Fields, 1884
"In the evening of a fine day the mists may be seen from hence as they rise in the meadows ... beginning first over the brooks, a long white winding vapour marking their course, next extending over the moist places and hollows."    
Wild Life in a Southern County, 1879
"Sometimes through these narrow slits (of cloud), long beams of light fall aslant upon the distant fields of the vale.  They resemble, only on a greatly lengthened scale, the beams that may be seen in churches of a sunny afternoon, falling from the upper windows on the tiled floor of the chancel, and made visible by motes in the air.  So through such slits in the cloudy roof of the sky the rays of the sun shoot downwards, made visible on their passage by the moisture or the motes of the atmosphere... the labourers say that the sun is sucking up water there."   
Wild Life in a Southern County, 1879
"It is midsummer, and midsummer, like a bride, is decked in white. On the high-reaching briars
white June roses; white flowers on the lowly brambles; broad white umbels of elder in the corner,  and white cornels blooming under the elm; honeysuckle hanging creamy white coronals round the ash boughs; white meadow-sweet flowering on the shore of the ditch; white clover, too, beside the gateway. As spring is azure and purple, so midsummer is white, and autumn golden. Thus the coming out of the wheat into ear is marked and welcomed with the purest colour."
Nature Near London,  1883
"...and finally is lost in the vast marshes which cover the site of the ancient London...  There exhales from this oozy mass so fatal a vapour that no animal can endure it. The black water bears a greenish-brown floating scum, which for ever bubbles up from the putrid mud of the bottom. When the wind collects the miasma, and, as it were, presses it together, it becomes visible as a low cloud which hangs over the place. The cloud does not advance beyond the limit of the marsh, seeming to stay there by some constant attraction; and well it is for us that it does not, since at such times when the vapour is thickest, the very wildfowl leave the reeds, and fly from the poison. There are no fishes, neither can eels exist in the mud, nor even newts. It is dead."      
After London, 1885
"...the heat pours down by day as if an invisible lens in the atmosphere focussed the sun's rays.
Strong woody knapweed endures it, so does toadflax and pale blue scabious, and wild mignonette..."                                       
Pageant of Summer, 1884
"Nature is a miniature painter and handles a delicate brush, the tip of which touches the tiniest
spot and leaves something living. The park has indeed its larger lines, its broad open sweep,
and gradual slope, to which the eye accustomed to small inclosures requires time to adjust
itself. These left to themselves are beautiful; they are the surface of the earth, which is always true
to itself and needs no banks nor artificial hollows. The earth is right and the tree is right: trim
either and all is wrong."                                                 
Field & Hedgerow, 1889
 
Fortunately, much of his work is still readily available as books and, often, as free e-books.  The Richard Jefferies Society promotes his writing and holds regular meetings.  Visit their website by clicking the link here.  The farmhouse where Richard Jefferies grew up is now a museum dedicated to his life and work and well worth visiting.  Click here for details.





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Friday, 24 January 2014

Clearing the Streets of Oxford

From the earliest days of the universities, there have been tensions between Oxford's 'Town & Gown', the term used to describe the non-academics and scholars.  In the 1300's  there were two days of rioting after two students complained of the quality of the local ale leaving many killed.  Not all altercations have ended in bloodshed and it was a general consensus to improve access into the town that the Covered Market was created.  The design was to be of the highest standard (by John Gwynn, designer of the Magdalen Bridge) although today it is all too easy not to notice the craftsmanship of the building.
In 1771 an Act was passed to rid the streets of food stalls and by 1774 the market had opened for business.  Originally, twenty butcher's shops and stalls were built, swiftly followed by a further twenty.  Today, 240 years later,  meat and poultry are still sold there with fruit and vegetables alongside clothing, footwear and jewellery.  Numerous cafes feed and water students, residents and tourists alike, fortunately no longer causing riots.
In recent times there has been a controversial increase in rent which has allegedly caused some businesses to close.  However, despite the present recession, the market is thriving although, in true market tradition, it is always possible to find a bargain there.
After the enclosed and bustling avenues of the market it is refreshing to step into the open air once more and to take in the sights and sounds of the city.  Surrounded by the historic colleges with their splendid architecture it is all too easy to forget that the market has played an important role in shaping the town.  It has a fascinating story of its own to tell.

Information about visiting the market, its present traders and its illustrious past can be found on it's website.  Click this link here to find out more.


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Sunday, 5 January 2014

A Year in Review 2013: the Second Half

July to the end of  December already is a memory and rapidly becoming a distant one at that.  Just five days into January and Christmas seems further back in the mind than it is in reality.  2014 has arrived and I am optimistically looking forward to all that it may bring.  Not that the last one was disappointing or sad in any way; just that with time flying by it is essential to make the most of every moment.  Of course, I'm very fortunate: I have my health, I have a great job, friends and family I can always rely upon and I live in a superb part of the English countryside.  Long may all those things last!
July:  The highlight of my year occurred this month.  An exciting and memorable launch of my first book to be published - a gardening book - Why Can't My Garden Look Like That? took place in Chipping Norton's award winning bookshop, Jaffe & Neale.  Would anyone turn up?  As it happened, very many did with people overflowing onto the street, the warm, sunny evening and the wine contributing to a street party feel to the occasion.  If you wish to find out more of the book or would like a signed copy you can find details here.
Many people are attracted to the magnificent looking but dangerous Giant Hogweed, also the subject of a post this month.  I was delighted when photographs from it were used in an educational video by the Hamilton County Soil and Water Conservation District (New York State).  Take heed of the messages if you come across the plant!
August: Travelling around the Cotswold Hills as I do every day in the course of my work you would think I would know most of what goes on there.  Nevertheless, I was surprised when I saw Tibetan flags fluttering in the breeze.  Further investigation found Alain Rouveure's galleries and tea room.  Of course, I couldn't leave until I'd tried out their lunch...
September:  Street fairs have been held for hundreds of years throughout England and Chipping Norton has an annual one that dates back to medieval charters.  Originally the time when livestock was sold and labour sought, these days they are purely held for pleasure.  Traffic has to be diverted around the town as the centre is blocked off by the rides and stalls.  Noisy, crowded and well lit they are great fun but I found  myself completely alone in darkness walking around it late one night.  It was an eerie experience, described here.
October:  The appearance of the secret valley was changed dramatically when the willow trees that line the banks of our little winding river were pollarded.  This dramatic 'haircut' is carried out only when necessary, the last time about fifteen years ago.  Suddenly, the view in the header of this blog has become wide open as every branch was removed leaving just the trunks standing.  The secret valley looks naked now but 'new clothes' will grow rapidly this coming spring.
November:  History isn't just about learning dates of battles, the most interesting aspects are those that we can so easily relate to.  Yet so much of this is forgotten over time and it takes teams of dedicated people, often volunteers, to literally unearth it.  A now deserted and seemingly empty part of the Exmoor National Park was, one hundred and fifty years ago, teeming with people and was at the very forefront of Victorian technology.  It was quite extraordinary what these engineers achieved and their story featured in two posts which created much interest and comment.  They can be found by clicking here and here.
December:  The blogging year ended on a cuddly note - looking after two adorable but naughty beagle puppies.  If you are a dog lover there is nothing better than to be mauled by puppies.  If you're not over-keen on dogs then you won't understand the attraction!  You could try to find out, however, by clicking here.
So what's going on in 2014?  Lots, hopefully. There is a new racehorse, more gardening, more travel, a lot more writing; it will be a busy year and how it pans out time - and this blog - will tell.


Thank you all so much for following my blog. Over one hundred thousand of you have looked at it since its inception which I find quite extraordinary and very humbling.  Please continue to do so and to tell all your blogging friends to come and pay me a visit, either on here or at my full website www.johnshortlandwriter.com .  I am also on Facebook and Twitter where daily updates can be found.  You are always very welcome to contact me with your comments or queries and I will do my best to answer them all.

Wishing you all a very happy and healthy New Year.



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